Strategies


Sample Activities and Assignments
Articles and Additional Resources
Grants to Fund Teaching with and in the Collections
Campus Resources


Teaching with archival, botanical, and museum collections can help students to evaluate evidence in primary documents, develop skills in visual and contextual analysis, collect and examine raw data, extract and synthesize information from a large amount of undifferentiated material, and correlate different sources in order to make informed arguments.

The links in this section provide examples of course assignments and activities that make use of the university’s public goods collections to enhance student learning, include articles on the benefits for student learning and how to assess it, and offer a list of campus and external resources for instructors and students.


Sample Activities and Assignments

Archival Document Worksheet (Musicology)
Questions to guide students’ note-taking on primary source documents. Read more »

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Besides a link to teaching resources from the Women’s Studies Program at the University of Texas at El Paso, this page contains links to sites concerned with curriculum transformation, prejudice, and discrimination.

University of Texas at El Paso Women's Studies Program Websites

Organizations, archives, comprehensive sites, and topical sites

Internet Resources on Women: Using Electronic Media in Curriculum Transformation
(University of Maryland, Baltimore County)

Site provides detailed information about women-related e-mail discussion forums, achives, and websites containing syllabi, bibliographies, articles, and other teaching resources

National Center for Curriculum Transformation Resources on Women (Towson University)

Links to various resources on women's issues and diversity

Understanding Prejudice and Discrimination

The site includes more than 2,000 links to prejudice-related resources, as well as searchable databases. The site is to supplement a McGraw-Hill anthology entitled Understanding Prejudice and Discrimination.

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These links describe ways to construct and react to assignments based on student written work, including creation of questions, strategies for grading, and ways to respond effectively to student writing.


Responding to Student Writing (Sweetland Writing Center, University of Michigan)
Practical advice for grading student written work effectively and efficiently.

Rubrics for Grading and Providing Feedback (Sweetland Writing Center, University of Michigan)
Includes examples of analytic, trait, holistic, numeric and grid rubrics.  

An overview of strategies for giving constructive commentary that will help students improve their writing. Read more »

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Different instructors perceive the classroom environment in different ways. The resources on this page provide guidance for instructors in how to think about their own teaching style and its impact on student learning. Resources include links to teaching surveys and inventories, and suggestions for how to use this information to accommodate the learning needs of their students.


CRLT Occasional Paper #16: Research on Student Notetaking: Implications for Faculty and Graduate Student Instructors (DeZure, Kaplan, & Deerman, 2001)
Reviews what research tells us about the impact of notetaking and how the review of notes affects student learning. The paper also explores the role that instructors play, suggesting several specific strategies to support students.

Reaching the Second Tier: Learning and Teaching Styles in College Science Education
Strategies for reaching students in the “second tier,” those who have the initial intention and the ability to go on to earn science degrees but instead switch to nonscientific fields. Read more »

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U-M graduate students and postdocs created these examples as part of the Rackham-CRLT Preparing Future Faculty Seminar. They are published here with the authors' consent. These examples represent the many different approaches to writing a teaching philosophy. According to CRLT's rubric for evaluating teaching philosophy statements, we consider each example to be "excellent" in at least one rubric category (e.g., goals for student learning, teaching methods, assessment of student learning, teaching inclusively, and structure, rhetoric and language).  

NOTE: These examples are available for review and should not be duplicated. Doing so is an act of plagiarism.

CRLT Occasional Paper No. 23: Writing a Statement of Teaching Philosophy for the Academic Job Search Read more »

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