Teaching with Technology

Mark your calendars for the 18th annual Enriching Scholarship Conference: May 4-8, 2015!

Teach Tech logoHosted by the Teaching and Technology Collaborative, Enriching Scholarship is an annual week-long series of seminars and workshops on integrating technology with teaching, learning, and research. If you are interested in adding to your technology toolkit or learning about great uses of technology in teaching at U-M, you have nearly 100 sessions to choose from at this year's conference. Registration is free and open to the University of Michigan community. Read more »

shadow

Large courses present some distinct challenges to teachers and students. How, for example, can hundreds of students practice challenging concepts simultaneously? And how can instructors in large courses gain insights about the learning of all of their many students? 

CRLT has sponsored several faculty learning communities focused on effective strategies for teaching in large courses. Faculty members learn together about pedagogical tools and technologies that facilitate student learning and then develop concrete applications for them in their specific courses. In this 6-minute video, one participant, psychology professor Pamela Davis-Kean, highlights her use of Google Forms to provide students practice with key skills and difficult concepts in an upper-level course of 150 students. She recommends it as a flexible, easy-to-learn technology that can enhance student interaction and engagement in a large course setting. Read more »

shadow

Interested in incorporating a new technology into your teaching? Looking for a boost to get started? Or a refresher on a technology you learned about at Enriching Scholarship in the spring? Join the Teaching with Technology Collaborative on Friday, November 21, for TeachTech FeastFest, a day-long series of 75-minute sessions on a range of technologies you can use in your courses.

Sessions will allow participants to sample and share ideas about a variety of tools and techniques to enhance student learning through technology. Topics include: screencasting, transitioning to the Canvas learning management system, designing effective presentation slides, using videoconferencing to connect your students with guest speakers around the world, understanding the enhancements of the latest version of iClicker, and much more. Register here soon: sessions are filling up quickly!

On this CRLT webpage, you can find a regularly-upated collection of examples of U-M instructors using these technologies and more. As always, CRLT consultants are also available to help you think through plans for integrating instructional technology into your particular courses.  Read more »

shadow

This semester, we are pleased to welcome peer instruction guru Eric Mazur to campus, presenting two talks and a workshop on February 14.  Eric Mazur is the Balkanski Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at Harvard University. In 1990, he began developing Peer Instruction, an active learning method, and he is the author of Peer Instruction: A User's Manual (Prentice Hall, 1997), a book that explains how to teach large lecture classes interactively. In 2011, he founded Learning Catalytics, a company that uses data analytics to improve learning in the classroom. We hope to see you at one or more of the events below. 

Peer Instruction: Confessions of a Converted Lecturer

Friday, 2/14/2014 - 9:00am - 10:30am 

I thought I was a good teacher until I discovered my students were just memorizing information rather than learning to understand the material. Who was to blame? The students? The material? I will explain how I came to the agonizing conclusion that the culprit was neither of these. It was my teaching that caused students to fail! I will show how I have adjusted my approach to teaching and how it has improved my students' performance significantly.

Student Learning Analytics at Michigan: Catalyzing Learning Using Learning Catalytics

Friday, 2/14/2014 - 12:00pm - 1:15pm Read more »

shadow
Brief Description: 

The online discussion is a familiar form of online writing for most students and instructors. Often, the instructor posts a question or prompt, and students respond either to the initial prompt, or to the posts of their classmates. The technologies available today offer many options for encouraging, organizing, and moderating online discussions. 

Tips for Using Online Discussion Tools

Preparation

  • Define clear goals and objectives for the online discussion.
  • Organize the online conference clearly by category and topic ahead of time.
  • Provide detailed instructions for students, including student roles and responsibilities.
  • Establish rules for appropriate and inappropriate behaviors before starting discussions.
  • Require students to log in for a certain number of times each week.
  • Establish clear expectations and standards for assessing student performance in the online discussion.
  • Distinguish between two types of conferences: a) formal and b) informal ones.
  • Create an outline of different types of activities for the online conferencing/discussion.
  • Make online discussion/conferencing an integral part of the course. (Do not separate what is happening in the conference from what is happening in the face-to-face class meetings.)
  • Establish a clear starting and ending time for each discussion topic.
  • Direct students to technology training classes, online tutorials, and any other assistance when necessary.

Facilitation Read more »

shadow