SLAM 2013-2014

Friday, April 11, 2014 - 12:00pm - 1:15pm
Great Lakes Central (Palmer Commons 4th Floor)

Browse the table below for video resources!

This session will give participants an overview of the projects undertaken by the 2013 and 2014 Provost's Learning Analytics Fellows. Sessions will spotlight multiple Learning Analytics Fellows projects, from diverse disciplines across U-M.

SLAM Presentations, Posters, and Handouts Read more »

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At his recent presentation in the Michigan League ballroom, Harvard physics professor Eric Mazur engaged the 250-person audience in an active learning exercise. An expert on the use of peer instruction in college courses, Mazur wanted the many teachers present to experience the power of this pedagogical strategy from a student perspective. So, using an example of question-based instruction from his own field, he provided a very brief explanation of thermal expansion, posed a multiple choice question that required application of the concept, and then guided those present through a 4-step exercise:

  1. Think silently about the question
  2. Commit to an answer (in this case, by using clickers)
  3. Find another 'student' who had a different answer and discuss the thinking behind each answer 
  4. Answer the question again.

The second set of answers was significantly more accurate than the first. Such a result generally follows such a peer instruction protocol, as much research has shown. Why? Through discussion, students shift their focus away from the answer itself and toward the thinking behind the answer, and those with the more accurate logic are generally able to make a more persuasive case. The demonstration also powerfully illustrated how such a technique can engage students emotionally as they become personally invested in learning and understanding the correct answer. The discussion created remarkable buzz in the room about thermal expansion--a topic that Mazur noted would unlikely generate such excitement if simply explained in lecture format. (You can get a sense of that buzz by watching a video of the event.)

In discussing the peer instruction technique, Mazur highlighted several strategies that can help engage all students in active learning, even in a very large course. These included: Read more »

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This session will give participants an overview of the projects undertaken by the 2013 and 2014 Provost's Learning Analytics Fellows.  Presentations will include: Read more »

Event Information
Dates: 
Fri, 04/11/2014 - 12:00pm - 1:15pm
Location (Room): 
Great Lakes Central (Palmer Commons 4th Floor)
Presenter(s): 
Learning Analytics Fellows
Eligible for Certificate: 
Not eligible for Certificate
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Presentation #1: Exploring the Impact of Michigan Learning Communities
Presentation #2: “What we do may not always be good for us”: Analytics of Michigan Medical Students’ Histology Study Strategies and Learning Success
 

Out-of-class experiences have been found to have a significant impact on student learning. These two SLAM presentations will focus on using learning analytics to measure outcomes in two different out-of-class contexts at U-M: Michigan Living-Learning Communities and online learning resources for Medical and Dental School students.

Students engage in a variety of co-curricular activities to enhance their educational experience.  But what impact do these programs have on academic achievement? In "Exploring the Impact of Michigan Learning Communities," Jennifer Maltby (Associate Director, Michigan Research Community) will present results from a multi-year effort to assess the impact of six residential Learning Communities at the University of Michigan. Read more »

Event Information
Dates: 
Fri, 02/21/2014 - 12:00pm - 1:15pm
Presenter(s): 
Jennifer Maltby, Michigan Research Community, U-M
Presenter(s): 
Michael Hortsch, Medical School, U-M
Eligible for Certificate: 
Not eligible for Certificate
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Most -- if not all -- of the important skills in our life are acquired outside the traditional classroom setting. Yet we continue to teach using lectures where students passively take down information. Instead, we should really focus on the assimilation of that information and shift the focus from teaching to helping students learn. Over the past 20 years, instructors world-wide have begun to adopt Peer Instruction to get students to think in class. With the advent of new technology the process can be significantly improved. A new data-analytics driven audience response system does away with multiple choice questions and helps instructors design better questions, manage time and process flow, and optimize the discussions in the classroom.

Eric Mazur is the Balkanski Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at Harvard University. In 1990, he began developing Peer Instruction, an active learning method, and he is the author of Peer Instruction: A User's Manual (Prentice Hall, 1997), a book that explains how to teach large lecture classes interactively. In 2011, he founded Learning Catalytics, a company that uses data analytics to improve learning in the classroom. Read more »

Event Information
Dates: 
Fri, 02/14/2014 - 12:00pm - 1:15pm
Location (Room): 
Johnson Rooms, 3rd Floor, Lurie Engineering Center (North Campus)
Presenter(s): 
Eric Mazur, Harvard
Eligible for Certificate: 
Not eligible for Certificate
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