DEI

Winter 2019

Through programs, consultations, and resources, the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching (CRLT) helps cultivate teaching-learning environments where instructors and students of all identities and backgrounds can excel.

Programs: Winter 2019 Seminar Series

For more information and to register, click on the individual titles below.

Writing a Diversity Statement (GSI & Postdocs) January 17, 3pm-4:30pm

Five-part Diversity and Inclusive Teaching Seminar (GSIs & Postdocs) 1/29, 2/5, 2/12, 2/19, 2/26 2pm-5pm

Implementing Inclusive Teaching Principles (GSIs, Postdocs, & Faculty) February 4, 10am-12pm *Session is full

Introduction to Engaged Design: Developing Community-Based Learning Courses (Faculty) February 21, 10am-12pm

Making the Most of Hot Moments in the Classroom (GSIs, Postdocs, & Faculty) February 28, 10am-12pm Read more »

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Five-part Diversity and Inclusive Teaching Seminar

The Diversity and Inclusive Teaching (DIT) Seminar is co-developed by the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching (CRLT) and the Program on Intergroup Relations (IGR), with support from Rackham Graduate School and IGR. It is a five-week seminar that provides participants an opportunity to learn about and practice a range of effective facilitation strategies for use in U-M's classrooms. We will focus on pedagogical techniques that productively engage student identity and experience in the learning process, as well as balance different voices and views. We will also discuss strategies for managing student resistance and conflict.

Seminar objectives
This seminar will survey a broad range of diversity and identity related issues that present themselves in classrooms and other learning environments. The curriculum over the five weeks will explore how social identities and diversity impact student and instructor experiences. The seminar will explore issues related to:

  • the relationship between instructor identity and inclusive teaching
  • balancing power and participation in the classroom
  • strategies for working through potential “hot moments” and conflict

Participants will leave this seminar with concrete strategies for implementing change in their teaching contexts. Participants will also receive a certificate of training after completing all five sessions.  Read more »

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US flag in the Diag

*updated November 7, 2018

During U-M's Veterans Week, it's a good time to reflect on the needs of our students who have served in the military. Did you know that record numbers of veterans are enrolling in U.S. colleges and universities--and many of them are here on U-M's campuses? Since January 2014, the university's tuition policy has allowed students who have served in the military to qualify for in-state tuition. If you teach at U-M, odds are good you've had or will have student veterans in your classroom.

How might your awareness of veterans in the classroom make a difference in your teaching? The research on student veterans suggests several strategies and cautions for teaching inclusively with veterans in mind. Here are a few: Read more »

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At all levels, from individual instructors to the upper administration, the University of Michigan has stated a commitment to inclusive teaching.  What does “inclusive teaching” mean at U-M? CRLT uses the following definition, which synthesizes a range of research related to teaching and learning as well as ideas collected in faculty focus groups:

Inclusive teaching involves deliberately cultivating a learning environment where all students are treated equitably, have equal access to learning, and feel valued and supported in their learning. Such teaching attends to social identities and seeks to change the ways systemic inequities shape dynamics in teaching-learning spaces, affect individuals’ experiences of those spaces, and influence course and curriculum design.

Some key aspects of this definition to note:  1. This definition is relevant in every discipline, whatever your content. 2. Inclusive teaching requires intentional practice over time. As one participant in a CRLT faculty workshop stated, “Teaching inclusively is a mindset. You can’t think about it once and be done.” 3. Inclusive teaching does not describe any particular pedagogical approach but names a foundational intention that shapes your approach, whether you are lecturing, leading discussion, holding office hours, or facilitating team-based learning. Read more »

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