GSI Guidebook

Guidelines or 'ground rules' for interactions, such as those below, can be shared with students or generated with them. Such guidelines can help clarify expectations and foster an environment of mutual respect and collaborative inquiry in any discipline. It can be helpful to revisit guidelines throughout the term, whether to reflect on group process or to frame potentially challenging conversations.  Further examples are available here.
 

Sample Guidelines for Class Participation
(from the CRLT GSI Guidebook) Read more »

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Adapted by Vilma Mesa and Mary Wright from Angelo & Cross (1993)
University of Michigan

“Classroom assessment helps individual college teachers obtain useful feedback on what, how much, and how well their students are learning. Faculty [and GSIs] can then use this information to refocus their teaching to help students make their learning more efficient and effective” (Angelo & Cross, p. 3).  The selected techniques listed below briefly describe the CAT, the amount of instructor preparation, and the amount of in-class time needed for each assessment. 

Name

Description

Time required

Application cards

After teaching about an important theory, principle, or procedure, ask students to write down at least one real-world application for what they have just learned to determine how well they can transfer their learning.

Prep: Low
In-class time: Low

Approximate analogies

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Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence, Carnegie Mellon University

The following list presents the basic principles and teaching strategies that underlie effective learning. These principles are distilled from research from a variety in disciplines.
 
1. Students’ prior knowledge can help or hinder learning.
 
Students come into our courses with knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes gained in other courses and through daily life. As students bring this knowledge to bear in our classrooms, it influences how they filter and interpret what they are learning. If students’ prior knowledge is robust and accurate and activated at the appropriate time, it provides a strong foundation for building new knowledge. However, when knowledge is inert, insufficient for the task, activated inappropriately, or inaccurate, it can interfere with or impede new learning. To apply this principle, consider the following teaching techniques:
 
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Being a Graduate Student Instructor (GSI) at the University of Michigan (U-M) can be a very exciting and sometimes challenging experience.  The purpose of this Guidebook is to serve as a compass by helping GSIs navigate through these experiences and directing new and experienced GSIs to practical teaching strategies and resources.  Many of the articles were specifically selected to support your endeavors and were written by U-M faculty, GSIs, staff, and scholars in the field of teaching and learning.  As a former U-M GSI, I remember navigating through my various instructional roles and responsibilities and using an earlier version of this Guidebook as a resource. I encourage you to review the contents and discover the various articles, including several new documents included in this edition.  Further, I believe you should seek out additional teaching resources and mentors from your department, school, or college who can support you further. Read more »

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Center for Research on Learning and Teaching


Academic integrity is the pursuit of scholarly activity in an honest and responsible manner. In the classroom, academic integrity involves a range of issues, including – but not limited to – cheating, plagiarism, and facilitating acts of academic dishonesty by others.


Teaching Strategies: Academic Integrity in the Classroom
http://www.crlt.umich.edu/publinks/acadintegrity

Academic integrity is the pursuit of scholarly activity in an honest and responsible manner. In the classroom, academic integrity involves a range of issues, including – but not limited to – cheating, plagiarism, and facilitating acts of academic dishonesty by others.

Academic Integrity in the Classroom
http://www.lib.umich.edu/academic-integrity

This website provides information for instructors on teaching about academic integrity, identifying plagiarized works, finding resources for students, and linking to UM policies and procedures for dealing with violations of academic integrity.

CRLT Occasional Paper No. 20:   Promoting academic integrity in the classroom, Meizlish, D. (2005).
http://www.crlt.umich.edu/resources/occasional Read more »

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