Faculty Worklife/Academic Job Search

This Occasional Paper summarizes the literature on GSI-faculty relationships in order to offer strategies for both GSIs and faculty to construct effective working partnerships. The nature of GSI-faculty teams varies widely across the University of Michigan, by factors such as size (some faculty supervise many GSIs, while others work with only one GSI), GSI responsibilities (such as grading, holding office hours, leading discussion sections, and studio or clinical work), discipline, and instructor identity.  As a result, this research is contextualized by recommendations drawn from the 2003 Provost’s Seminar on Graduate Students as Teachers, at which over 162 faculty and GSI attendees from fourteen UM schools and colleges strategized about ways to proactively cultivate effective GSI-faculty relationships and address problems when they occur.

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This Occasional Paper is designed to help experienced graduate students write a statement of teaching philosophy. The paper contains four sections. First, we offer suggestions for making a philosophy of teaching explicit and getting it on paper.  Second, we discuss research on characteristics of effective statements. Third, we introduce a rubric that can guide the development and crafting of a teaching statement that search committees will value.  Finally, we address questions that job candidates often raise about this sometimes perplexing document. 

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This Occasional Paper presents the 2010 U-M Faculty WorkLife Study survey data on teaching. The specific questions addressed here include: How much time do faculty spend working and how is their workload divided among teaching, research and service? What are the challenges that U-M faculty encounter in managing their heavy workloads? How satisfied are faculty with their teaching and their perceptions of the tenure process? Data are presented for all tenured and tenure-track faculty (except those in the Medical School because of the unique character of their work).

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